The death of a saint.

The Strawberry Shortcake balloon that floated above juxtaposed the solemness of the scene that surrounded it.

Flowers and pictures, some with faded colors that marked their age and others only weeks old, showed the life of a man who had led a full life.

Bodies–some from those pictures–filled the seats.  Hearts listened to son after son share their memories of a diligent man who loved only his family more than he loved hard work and fixing things, no matter how old, with his own bare hands.  Lesson #1: Why pay someone to do something you can do yourself?

Story after story, we shed our tears.  But in the midst of sadness, the sweet sound of laughter also echoed.  It’s a reminder of another good life lesson: In the midst of adversity, only remember the good.

And regardless of reasons, we celebrate the life of a man who professed a faith in the Creator of the world.  We rejoice in the hope promised us in His word.  We reflect on the words of a four-year-old grandchild who upon hearing that grandpa was “sick”, said:

Well, if he’s sick, Jesus has the medicine to make him better.

How profound the words of a child.  How the child did not know just how true that statement is.

And with child-like faith, much like the faith that wants grandpa to have a Strawberry Shortcake balloon tied to the last place his physical body will be, may we strive to serve the King of kings with the short life we are given on this earth.

Lesson 3; It is appointed for man to die once (Heb. 9:27)…when that time comes, will family and friends have a celebration of your life knowing you are rejoicing for eternity with your heavenly maker?

I sure hope so.  For I cannot imagine sitting in a room where hope is completely sucked out.

For in the midst of the tragic circumstances that led to today, there was much rejoicing.  And for that we say, Thank you, Lord.

May as many as possible be able to have a celebration on the day of their earthly good-bye.

Complete with Strawberry Shortcake balloons and all.

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